Dead cats and Scott Morrison

By December 10, 2021Australian Politics, Media

There were rumours of Gladys Berejiklian being asked to run for a federal seat for many months before her canoodling with Daryl Maguire became public knowledge, but it only really hit the headlines when Scott Morrison mentioned it as a possibility. This was some time after Berejiklian had not only resigned from the premiership of New South Wales, but from state politics1.

This was presumably because she had seen what evidence the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) had, and realised that stepping aside from the premiership alone was not a viable option, as the evidence was too damning.

Surveys of Berejiklian’s likeability before, during, and after her appearance at ICAC were reported by journalist Alexandra Smith in the Sydney Morning Herald, which showed that her popularity had not slumped much2. The lack of serious dent in Berejiklian’s popularity was enough to have some Liberals suggesting more seriously that she might like to have a crack at a federal seat in next year’s election. The electorate of Warringah was mentioned as a possibility, as that was currently held by independent Zali Steggall, and was previously a safe Liberal seat. Ever since Berejiklian resigned, Morrison has been critical of ICAC, calling it a “kangaroo court” that had ‘done over’ Berejiklian who he said was a person of “great integrity”3. You have to laugh, as this was said after much of the evidence had been seen in the public hearings of ICAC.

Morrison also then suggested Berejiklian might like to run for a federal seat, saying: “I think this is a great opportunity, if Gladys wishes to run, but that’s up to her”. Then, as if ignoring the fact that Berejiklian was under investigation by ICAC for breaching public trust, he stated he would “let the people decide”3.

One of the many ironies of this suggestion that Berejiklian should run for federal parliament was that Andrew Clennell, political editor of Murdoch’s appalling Sky News Australia, had a go at the media that fell for this story. He tweeted:

“Seven days of journalists running with utmost seriousness a yarn that was never going to happen. Bizarre stuff, particularly by 9 [Nine Media] newspapers.”4

The unfortunate Alexandra Smith, state political reporter for the Sydney Morning Herald (a Nine Media newpaper) replied, seemingly without putting her brain in gear: “It was the PM pushing it, not us. We reported what he was saying.”5

I replied rather ham-fistedly with: “Therein lies the problem. Just remind yourself what story was in the news just before the dead cat arrived. Wasn’t it Labor’s climate policy? There you go.”6

The ever perspicacious Ronni Salt also replied with: “And thus the world got Trump, Boris and every other populist leader who learned how to manipulate the media as their own personal football.”7

Michael was a little more forceful in his derision: “A PM who is a persistent & blatant liar & who specialises in dead cat diversions but you ‘journalists’ simply take his & the PMO’s dictation, unquestioningly. Naive? Lazy? Incompetent? Complicit? Pathetic.”8

Arno Schaaf also replied to Smith, with: “Oh is that the role of a journalist these days, just report what the PM says? No room for a bit of critical thinking, investigation or analysis? Bit like Pravda.”9

The poor benighted Alexandra Smith replied to Arno: “Of course it isn’t. But equally, Berejiklian did not rule it out despite journalists putting it to her and asking for comment”.10

One could almost imagine the phonecall from Morrison to Berejiklian.

Morrison: Hello Gladys. Do you want to run in Warringah in the next election?

Berejiklian: No. I’m finished with politics.

Morrison: Are you sure?

Berejiklian: Yes. I miss Daryl; we were so good together.

Morrison: Alright. But we want to get the Labor Party’s 43% emissions reduction target off the front pages, so I thought we’d spread it about that you just might run in Warringah in the next election. So….

Berejiklian: No I….

Morrison: Listen. We will just put it out as a possibility, and all we want is that for a few days you tell any journalist who asks, that you haven’t decided yet. Then, when the media has moved on, you can tell them you are not running. That way we get the Labor Party off the front page, you get to leave politics and the media do what we want them to do.

The epithet ‘dead cat’, which Michael and I mentioned, refers to the introduction of a dramatic, shocking, or sensationalist topic to divert media attention away from a topic more damaging for a political party. Morrison is a past master at deadcatting. So, from what topic was Morrison’s Berejiklian dead cat designed to deflect media attention? Could it have been Labor’s 2030 emissions reduction target of 43% which makes the coalition’s target of 26-28% look dangerously inadequate? If that was it, then the dead cat was very successful. The Nine Media newspapers fell for it hook, line and sinker.

Why do so many journalists fall for dead cats such as this? I suspect it is because so many of them do not take their job seriously enough, and do not think too deeply about what they are reporting or writing. Some of them may simply be incapable; stenography may be their forté. It is so much easier to regurgitate what Morrison says or what his office sends out (much as I have done in the Tweets above), than it is to be a journalist of the quality of Laura Tingle, Katharine Murphy, or Niki Savva, for example. Morrison has been shown to lie constantly. He even lies about his lying11. It is long past time that more journalists treated him like the liar he is, rather than just regurgitating the lies he spouts. Maybe if more journalists reported what something means, not what Morrison just said about it, our democracy would be better off.

Sources

  1. https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/oct/01/nsw-premier-gladys-berejiklian-resigns-after-icac-announces-investigation
  2. https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/berejiklian-s-halo-has-not-slipped-survey-shows-20211124-p59bop.html
  3. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-12-06/prime-minister-pushes-for-gladys-berejiklian-to-run-in-warringah/100676304
  4. https://twitter.com/aclennell/status/1469054098121003008
  5. https://twitter.com/AlexSmithSMH/status/1469077293662294018
  6. https://twitter.com/BlotReport/status/1469170409887043585
  7. https://twitter.com/RonniSalt/status/1469163887282978816
  8. https://twitter.com/fount8/status/1469154031603884036
  9. https://twitter.com/aussiearnie/status/1469106994858508289
  10. https://twitter.com/AlexSmithSMH/status/1469109612389421059
  11. https://blotreport.com/2021/11/10/morrison-lying-about-lying/

16 Comments

  • James Faulkner says:

    It’s more likely most journalists aren’t actually smart enough. Most of them seem to be the same egoistic type who think just because they read Jane Austen in high school they are literate. In a culture where sports, 4wds and beer are the main priority for the masses, it’s not likely we will produce many successful intelligent journalists. Of course, we have some, but most are just ordinary Jane Norman types who think highly of themselves but can barely manage a thought of their own.

    • admin says:

      James,
      It certainly seems that many of them are out of their depth.

    • Arthur Baker says:

      James, If people read Jane Austen, not just at school but anywhere and at any time, they may or may not be literate, but they surely have too much spare time. I’ve often commented that her famous, ridiculously prolix, 23-word introductory sentence in “Pride and Prejudice” can be expressed in Plain English as “Everyone knows rich men should be married”. But hey, why write seven words when 23 will do?

  • Arthur Baker says:

    Of all the jobs available in this world, the one I think I would enjoy least would be political journalism. The poor sods can’t take a trick. If they ask Morrison a question he rejects its premise. If they work for the ABC and criticise Morrison, he and his mates jump up and down, shout “lefty bias!” and cut their funding. If they report what Morrison says, people accuse them of being stenographers. If they report what Morrison says, make an adverse comment and they’re right, they’ll for sure finish up in his Little Black Book and either be barred from his press conferences or deliberately shut out of asking a question. If they report what Morrison says, opine that it’s a dead cat, and it turns out it’s not, that’s a black mark on their CV for ever. If they look old, especially if they’re female, people say they’re past it, senile, and should retire gracefully. If they look young like Jane Norman, people think she’s a schoolkid on work experience and troll her on Twatter. If they can’t get a job anywhere else because only a third of journalist positions aren’t with a Murdoch publication, they get told what to write and sacked if they don’t. And I bet the pay’s not all that crash hot either.

    • admin says:

      Arthur,
      While some of that is true, being ‘old’ doesn’t seem to bother Laura Tingle (60), Niki Savva (~70), Malcolm Farr (70) and numerous other top grade journalists. Neither does sticking the boot into Morrison when it is required, as all have done recently. I also think you overestimate the stories’ (deceased moggies or not) effects on their CV.

  • Warren says:

    I know there are many out there in BLOT Land who are too afraid to ask this question. Who’s Jane Austen?

    And will Mrs BLOT please stop using big words. Perspicacious!! Really. At least you didn’t confuse it with perspicuous, which I did.

  • Mark Dougall says:

    The real story here is exactly that set out today by Katharine Murphy. It is that of a desperate PM with nothing to lose using this to try and get himself a few votes from those nitwits who think Glad is hard done by, as well as just maybe the very off chance she might run, and the also off chance that she may win, in the hope that that this will somehow help in the election that is looking fairly difficult for the LNP at the moment. It is also useful for him to use this opportunity to undermine something set up to ensure probity and combat corruption. Something he does not like because it actually does what it should do, a concept so foreign to him, and his cronies, that it must be attacked, even when the attacks are, as Katharine Murphy said, disgraceful. Not all journalists have missed this. I even heard Greg Brown, from the Australian, on the ABC this week, saying something pretty similar.

    Arthur there is no such thing as too much spare time. Spare time is what life is all about. Also Jane Austen was great writer. Loved reading all her books. Witty and intelligent. I would be pretty confident that Morrison has never read Austen, or any proper book. I reckon a picture book version of the bible is about it.

    • admin says:

      Mark,
      I laughed out loud when I read the second paragraph. I also suspect that Morrison is likely buggered electorally; especially now that the media seem to be treating him as he deserves, and as so many people on Twitter and elsewhere have been pointing out that they have not done previously. As Ronni Salt pointed out; they have been reporting on the puppet show, not what is going on behind the curtain. This seems to be ending now, as more journalists are realising what a vile lying human Morrison is.

  • Glenn says:

    And the PM’s second pick for Warringah happens to be Alan Jones.

  • Warren says:

    How do I know Admin is A women? It’s the way she writes. And how does Admin know I’m a he?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Bitnami