The internet connection saga continues

By March 14, 2022Business, Technology

As I related almost two weeks ago our internet connection has been various shades of cactus since last August and, as we were told by our provider, has been completely cactus since February 26th. A technician came to our property two days later and discovered what he thought was the problem, but couldn’t fix it because it needed a cherry picker to do so. He said that this would be organised soon1. Meanwhile, as the rain has stopped and the winds have died down a bit, the internet connection has come back a bit. It has, as I write this, a download speed of 26.5 Megabits per second (Mbps), which is about half our previous ‘normal’ speed, but it still drops out occasionally.

We received notification on Wednesday March 9th, that the NBN technician was going to come on the morning of Thursday, March 10th, to fix the issue. The technician did not arrive so my partner called (I was out of town) to find out what was happening. They were told that the technician did not have the part, but would arrive on the morning of Friday, March 11th with the part, to fix the problem.

The technician did not turn up early on the Friday, so my partner called to find out when the technician was coming as they had appointments and errands to run in the afternoon. Nobody answered the call. My partner rang again soon afterward to find out the expected arrival time, but again there was no answer. However shortly after that, the technician sent a text message: “Sorry, can’t talk right now”. Shortly after receiving this, my partner replied by text message asking if the NBN technician was going to complete the job on the Friday. A text message came in reply: “Gm [Good Morning?] i haven’t got the part other tech will have a good day”. Partner Replied on Friday, March 11th, at 9:02am “So no visit today? When will the job be completed?

There has been complete silence since then.

Source

  1. https://blotreport.com/2022/03/02/internet-connection/

10 Comments

  • Cathleen O'Connor says:

    my download 1.14am 17.6mbps Don’t think I have ever had 26.5.. But I often have less than 10

    • admin says:

      Cathleen,
      I am not a high-end user, so I’d probably be able to cope with a speed like yours most of the time. However it is the dropouts which can go for 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes or days which bugger everything up. In addition, when using my phone hotspot, the phone system has occasionally dropped out too.

  • Warren says:

    Are you able to tell your readers who is your fantastic provider Mrs BLOT?

  • Warren says:

    I’m not encouraged to move to the NBN. Many I know are moving away from it. I wonder when the small gov., and small minded, LNP will sell the the NBN?

  • Arthur Baker says:

    I’m not sure whether this is relevant, but I noticed that when the “Big Wet” was on, from late February to last week, we experienced occasional glitches with our broadband and TV reception. Neither was a big deal, inconvenience and disruption were slight and short-lived, but it was remarkable because it had never happened before. We live in Sydney’s northern beaches area, and our suburb was VERY close to the epicentre of Sydney’s biggest deluge. I’m still getting the occasional TV glitch (pixellation, audio discontinuity), so perhaps some unusual atmospheric disturbance is still ongoing. I’m not a tech-head or aq climatologist, so I really haven’t a clue. And your problem has been going on for way too long. Good luck getting it fixed. One day I’ll relate our Telstra saga during the switch to NBN, which convinced us never to have any dealings with Telstra ever again. Our communications are almost perfect these days except during inundations.

    • admin says:

      Arthur,
      Our NBN has many more dropouts during rain and wind, probably because the box is still on the dangle. The latest event in the saga, is that the NBN have told us that the connection will ‘definitely be fixed’ next Monday (March 21). We will see how we go. Our switch to the NBN was quick and problem free.

      • Arthur Baker says:

        Sorry, being a Johnny-come-lately who has only resided in this country 49 and a half years, I have to admit “the box is still on the dangle” is beyond my somewhat limited grasp of Australian colloquial English. Mind you, I’m proud to report that my almost-half-century of intensive study of the Australian vernacular hasn’t been entirely wasted – I do know that a promise of “will definitely be fixed” means there is about a 50% chance that whatever it is won’t. It’s effectively a coin toss. Bonne chance, excuse my French.

        • admin says:

          Arthur,
          Chortle! The box to which our phone line is attached, is not itself attached to the telegraph pole, and is dangling by the wires which take the signal further on. Hence, ‘the box is still on the dangle’. Given that this will be the fifth time an NBN technician has rolled up since August, the phrase ‘will definitely be fixed’ engenders a great deal of scepticism.

          • Arthur Baker says:

            My apologies, you did mention your dangly bits in the original post, and I should have remembered. So “the box is still on the dangle” is a tech-related Blot-specific reference to a unique physical entity, not a phrase in geheral usage with wider (possibly metaphorical or euphemistic) significance, although I’m sure a creative speaker of the English language could think up a few possible applications for it. Glad we cleared that up.

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