Weird virus?

By June 18, 2022Uncategorized

I started feeling unwell on a Monday night, with tiredness and aching joints. This got worse on the Tuesday when I ached all over, had a mild headache, and an intermittent cough. Thinking it might be Covid-19, I did a Rapid Antigen Test (RAT) which turned out to be negative. That was a bit of a relief. However, I was still going downhill and in addition to the constant aching of everything, my stomach started doing backflips and eating anything led to constant nausea and ineffective attempts at preventing a round-trip meal ticket (i.e. vomiting). The only thing I kept down on the Wednesday was a dinner comprising half a vegemite sandwich. I had the other half for breakfast late Thursday morning. The feeling of tiredness was overwhelming. On the Thursday, I got out of bed at about 8 o’clock after a decent night’s sleep but two hours later I nodded off on the lounge for another three hours. I found it exhausting to simply stand up long enough to have a shower. Just to check my Covid-19 negative status, I did another RAT that night, which turned up negative as expected. On the Friday, I felt a little better; the constant overall aching had largely gone, the tiredness was still intense, the stomach was still doing backflips and the cough had become more irritating. This time I managed to stand up long enough to have a shower and a shave, although I needed a long sit down and many deep breaths afterwards. Feeling better after having a shave, I decided to take the bull by the horns, and had a curried vegetable samosa and an apple Danish for a very late lunch. I spent the rest of the day trying to keep it down, this time, successfully. Almost every movement made the nausea intensify, so I just sat on the lounge, trying not to move.

Today, the nausea is still there and my stomach is still doing backflips and making a racket. For breakfast, I had a slice of bread with some margarine and vegemite, and it doesn’t feel like it is going to bounce. 

If this is caused by a virus, which seems likely, it is one of the weirdest I have ever contracted.

19 Comments

  • Arthur Baker says:

    I’m very sorry to hear of your affliction, but I do recommend avoidance of Vegemite, which can only have made things worse. As every English migrant knows, it is unfit for human consumption, and basically is a hoax which native-born Australians use to try to confuse newcomers. A bit like drop-bears. But I was awake-up, or as Joni Mitchell famously sang, “hip to their tricks”. If you were born and raised in this country, I’m surprised you weren’t aware of this. Get yourself a jar of good old English Branston pickle. That’ll sort you out, quick-smart. You’re welcome.

    • Laurie says:

      Don’t make me report you to the Dept. of Sending Immigrants Back to Where They Came From (formerly Border Farce) and have you deported on character grounds.

      Vegemite is the finest spread known to man. As an English migrant, you probably mistook it for that peculiar, sweet imitator Marmite and applied it thickly. This would certainly risk an overdose in an unacclimatised foreigner. Vegemite should be used sparingly. I know people who are so economical with it, the can make a small jar last years…

      Branston pickle? A sad, insipid substitute for a good chutney. For preference it comes in a reused jar and sealed with a rubber band. A hand written label is optional.

      • admin says:

        Laurie,
        Hear! Hear!

      • Arthur Baker says:

        Vegemite, Marmite, Promite, whatever the variant, Meh. The very stink of it tells you it’s appalling muck which shouldn’t get anywhere near your mouth. If you can’t afford proper food to put on the table, I’ll be happy to recommend a foodbank or even send you a food parcel. My mother was in the British Women’s Land Army for the duration of World War II, digging up potatoes, milking cows, caring for chooks etc, and knew exactly how a hungry nation should be fed, with good wholesome tucker. From her, I learned everything I know about nutrition. In 1954 when rationing ended, she even came back from the fruit and veggie shop with a single banana, the first she’d seen since 1938, and let me have half of it. We had it tough in those days. Aussies? Huh. Wouldn’t know how lucky they are. A few bombs dropped on Darwin and a coupla Japanese midget subs in Sydney Harbour and you think you suffered more than what the Luftwaffe did to England? Pah!

        • admin says:

          Arthur,
          Jeez, that got weird very quickly. By the way, it wasn’t a ‘few bombs dropped on Darwin’. That is a bit wide of the mark. There were many raids on Darwin, Broome and sundry other places in northern Australia during 1942 and 1943.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_raids_on_Australia,_1942–1943
          My old man was up in Darwin at the time in signals attached to the artillery and was pretty busy at the time. My hometown, Newcastle was also shelled by a Japanese submarine after the attack on Sydney and when I was a primary school kid one of the homeowners a few doors away was digging in his back yard. It apparently was one of he unexploded shells from the submarine (out of ~20 fired, only one exploded). The police cordoned off the street, the bomb squad (sensu lato) was called up and ice-creams were bought. It was excitement plus.

    • admin says:

      Arthur,
      I’m a happy little vegemite. The trick is knowing not to layer it on too thick. I have occasionally been party to scaring some Europeans by doing the opposite. ‘Branston pickle’ sounds like a nickname for a suppository.

      • Arthur Baker says:

        The “trick” is not to “layer it on” at all. Try this recipe. Take a slice of bread. Put it in the toaster. When it’s nice and brown, take it out. It doesn’t need any more brown, it’s already brown. Apply butter. Then eat it. You’ll never look back. As for putting pickle up your backside, I do sometimes wonder why I decided to stay in a country inhabited by such barbarians.

        • admin says:

          Arthur,
          Chortle!

          • Laurie says:

            Aha! Her Doktor* Laurie has diagnosed ze problem: an undeveloped palate due to being raised on boiled vegetables! Ze confusion of colour and flavour is ein dead giveaway! I suggest the immediate application of curry (and not the sort with raisins).

            As for putting pickle up the bum, that sounds rather more like and upper class English weaze than Australian. I bet they do it at Eton…

            * Dr of Photocopying, Count of Ten, Order at the Bar.

          • admin says:

            Laurie,
            Nah, at Eton, you are supposed to put your todger in a dead pig’s mouth. That is how David Cameron got to be leader of the Conservative Party.

  • Keryn booker says:

    Might be man flu , but really depends on what rat test you are doing . If not nose swab or doctors test , it can come up negative.

    • admin says:

      Keryn,
      I wish it was man-flu. At least then it would have been for a purpose (to engender sympathy?). While I kept some lunch down (corned beef and salad sanger), I am as weak as a kitten.

  • Laurie says:

    Meh, sounds like COVID in a healthy vaccinated individual (or at least that’s what my Doc told me). Think of it as skipping the initial stages and going straight to the immune response. I had it Easter weekend, but with half a day of fever and shaking so hard I couldn’t hold a glass of water, felt exhausted by lunchtime for the following week; all the stuff you expect from a heavy immune response.

    Two RATS tests and an eye watering big lads PCR test all came back negative. RATS tests have a high false negative rate (20% according to the ABC – I remember reading it was much higher) so the chances of hitting two false readings in a row aren’t high. By the time I got to the PCR, it was more than 48 hours later and no longer detectable.

    Or maybe it was food poisoning,says my Doc…

    • admin says:

      Laurie,
      I have had food poisoning a couple of times; once at a restaurant in Battery Point in Hobart, and once while I was out bush doing field work on my own (from freeze-dried stroganoff). This was not food poisoning. Speaking to my GP, he suspected it was simply a virus; one I could have done without.

  • clive pegler says:

    vot a lot ov girlie mens ve haff assembled here huh? (referencing the good old vege here). As any true red blooded patriotic vegemite aficionado would tell you, it needs to be spread almost deep enough to support a knife blade on point. At this point it is permitted to mix with the, also liberally applied, butter, while taking utmost care not to reintroduce any butter back to the jar because, as any 6YO (patriot) will attest, the contents will then become exceptionally poisonous. and marge? pfffftttttt!

    • Arthur Baker says:

      “while taking utmost care not to reintroduce any butter back to the jar”. I don’t care if my Australian-born wife does that, because she’s the only one in our household who ever opens the Vegemite jar. What I find outrageous is the opposite problem – disgusting traces of Vegemite in the butter.

    • Laurie says:

      “Girlie mens”? That sounds suspiciously like what a Belgian might say…

      I’m with you on the marge, mind. Nasty stuff that. Burns well in an oil lamp*, which I am sure Arthur will tell us merry stories of having to do during the blitz 🙂

      * So does butter.

      • Arthur Baker says:

        Greetings, Laurie. Fortunately the blitz was before my time. I was one of the many born in the immediate post-war years as a result of WW2 (because my parents would never have met if the war hadn’t occurred). In the spirit of Monty Python’s “Four Yorkshiremen” sketch, we were lucky! Had an existence which wouldn’t have happened except for the war, without ever being bombed or shot at. The worst things that happened to my fortunate generation were crowded classrooms, parents who wanged on about the war (as one might expect) until the day they died, and a shortage of bananas until 1954.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Bitnami